IATE, the last word… maybe!

001By now I think we’ve discussed the import of an IATE TBX into CAT tools as much as we can without going over old ground again.  But if you’re reading this and don’t know what I’m talking about then perhaps review these two articles first:

What a whopper!  – which is all about the difficulties of handling a TBX the size of the one that is available from the IATE download site.

A few bilingual TBX resources – which is a short article sharing a few of the TBX files I extracted for a few users who were having problems dealing with the 2.2Gb, 8 million term whopper we started with.

So why am I bringing this up again?  Well I do like to have the last word…  don’t we all… but this time I wanted to share the work of Henk Sanderson who has put a lot of time and effort into breaking the IATE TBX into bite sized chunks and at the same time cleaning them up so they can be more useful to a translator.  I also wanted to share the successful import of the complete original TBX from IATE directly into MultiTerm Server:

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What a whopper!

01I love this cartoon with the husband and wife fishing on a calm weekend off.

“Honey, I got a big one on!”

She’s hooked a whopper and he casually responds in the way he always does when she occasionally catches a fish on Sunday morning.

“Yes dear, uh huh…”

The equipment they’ve got, from the boat to the fishing rods, is all perfectly suitable for their usual weekend activities but hopelessly inadequate for handling something like this!  Little do they know that the whopper under the surface is going to give them a little more trouble when they try to bring him on board!

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Yanks versus Brits… linguistically speaking!

001The debate over who’s right, and what’s the correct spelling… localization or localisation… will undoubtedly go on for a long time, unless you ask my Mother who knows the British are right of course!  I always lean towards the British spelling, probably the result of my upbringing, and when asked I always take the British point of view.

There are many Americanisms that have crept into our everyday speech, and if I’m really honest I use them too!  If I’m even more honest I think I always used them and didn’t even know they were American English and not British English.  The “z’s” are easy, but who gets cypher and cipher the wrong way around, disk and disc, gaol and jail or even meter and metre.  No doubt there are those amongst us who would never get them wrong (my Mother would never get them wrong) but I think there are plenty of words like this that have become, dare I say it… interoperable!  But what happens if you don’t want to get them wrong, and if you always want to stick to American English or British English?  In our business this is often an important distinction, so with that introduction let’s take a quick look at how you could manage something like this using MultiTerm and Studio.

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Glossary to TM… been there, done that…

#01So now let’s flip the process on its head!

I’m not sure how often the need arises to create a Translation Memory from a Termbase but I can tell you that the article I wrote previously called “Creating a TM from a Termbase, or Glossary, in SDL Trados Studio” is the most popular article I have ever written… closely followed by an article on why wordcounts differ between tools called “So how many words do you think it is?“.  It’s an unfair competition because the latter was written some 4-months afterwards so needs more time to catch up… but there is no denying that the process of converting a Glossary to a Translation Memory is something people are interested in.

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Is MultiTerm really that hard to learn?

Learning MultiTermSomething we see some users of SDL products saying, and often non-users even promoting, is that MultiTerm is a complex product and very hard to use.  Is this true?  Well if I’m honest there probably isn’t any smoke without fire… but perhaps this is really all down to a lack of good documentation with plenty of examples to explain how to do things?  Or perhaps this is down to converting spreadsheets or other formats into MultiTerm format; so specific operations rather than simply being able to use MultiTerm itself?  Certainly MultiTerm Convert, which you need to use in order to create a termbase from another format can be quite complicated if you don’t understand a little about the structure of a termbase in MultiTerm.  If you only want a simple glossary the entire process is much simplified thanks to the Glossary Converter available free through the Open Exchange… but is this enough and does this represent a majority of usecases?

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If I knew then what I know now!

Just learningPeople often tell me that using Studio is complicated.  Other people, who have been working with Studio tell me it’s actually quite logical once you get your mind around it.  I clearly lean towards the latter and whilst I always try hard to see the difficulties the conclusion I always come back to, rightly or wrongly, is that many users who used Trados in the past expect Studio to be similar and then struggle when they discover it’s not.

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Great news for terminology exchange…

Terminology Exchange... TBX… and this will be particularly good news for users working in SDL Trados Studio with SDL WorldServer.  Today the Glossary Converter was updated on the OpenExchange with a number of very cool enhancements.  These are support for users still working with SDL MultiTerm 2009, support for Microsoft Excel workbooks containing multiple worksheets, Spanish user interface, a number of smaller usability improvements and bugfixes and the one I’m most interested in here… support for TBX.  TBX is a TermBase eXchange format that was developed for sharing terminology between different tools.  The reason I’m so interested is because if you want to use a TBX file in Studio as a resource for your AutoSuggest then you have to use MultiTerm Convert in order to create a MultiTerm TermBase.  This is not too difficult, but it can take a little work if there is a complex structure in the TBX… and of course it can take a little while as it’s at least a two-step process.  So making this easier would be great.

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